Louisiana Criminal Defense Lawyer

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Criminal Defense Attorney in Louisiana

Louisiana is home to Mardi Gras, LSU football, and some of the best food that you have ever tasted. Located by the Gulf of Mexico, you can also spend time fishing, surfing, or otherwise enjoying your time in one of the greatest states in America. Of course, just because you’re having fun doesn’t mean that you can take actions that might harm yourself or others. If you do, there is a chance that you might find yourself in jail or standing before a judge trying to explain why you shouldn’t be in jail.

What to Know If You’re Charged with a Crime

If you are charged with a crime, the best thing to do is to remain silent. Authorities may try to entice you to talk by saying that you’ll get to go home if you admit what you did or that you’ll receive other forms of clemency in exchange for a statement. However, the truth is that admitting to a crime just makes it easier for the government to obtain a conviction in less time and with less effort.

You also have the right to ask for a Louisiana criminal defense attorney. After you request an attorney, all questioning must stop until this person can be physically by your side. Legal counsel may advise you not to answer certain questions or may advise authorities that a line of questioning is improper under state or federal law. It may also be possible for an attorney to put an end to a line of questioning if your rights are being violated.

Put our highly experienced team on your side

Brian J. Kuester
Brian J. Kuester

Former U.S. Attorney

Former DA

Amanda Marshall
Amanda Marshall

Former U.S. Attorney

Local Counsel

Joe Brown
Joe Brown

Former U.S. Attorney
& Former District Attorney

Local Counsel

John W. Sellers
John W. Sellers

Former Senior Trial Attorney
U.S. Department of Justice

Local Counsel

John W. Sellers
Linda Julin McNamara

Former Chief, DOJ Appeals

Local Counsel

Elizabeth Stepp
Elizabeth Stepp

Litigation Counsel

Aaron L. Wiley
Aaron L. Wiley

Former Federal Prosecutor

Local Counsel

Roger Bach
Roger Bach

Former Special Agent (OIG)

Timothy E. Allen
Timothy E. Allen

Former Senior Special Agent

Chris Quick
Chris Quick

Former Special Agent (FBI & IRS-CI)

David M. Bentz
David M. Bentz

Former U.S. Secret Service Agent

Ray Yuen
Ray Yuen

Former Supervisory Special Agent (FBI)

Why Hire an Attorney from The Criminal Law Defense Firm?

Perhaps the best reason why you would want to hire an attorney from our firm is that our attorneys are mostly former federal prosecutors or former federal agents. Our team has experience working for agencies such as the IRS, OIG, and DOJ, which means that they know how the government thinks when it pursues a criminal case.

This is important because your attorney may be able to determine based on the state’s actions whether there is room for a plea deal. Your attorney may also be able to determine the relative strength of the case against you based on how the government acts during an investigation.

For instance, if you are charged with a lesser offense, it may mean that the government doesn’t feel confident about its case. However, if you are charged with multiple minor offenses, it may mean that the state is making a conviction in your case a priority. It’s not uncommon for a prosecutor to pursue as many charges as possible to increase the odds of a conviction of some sort. Adding charges may also be done as a way to increase the state’s leverage during plea negotiations.

Your attorney will likely explain how the government’s actions might influence the outcome of your case as well as the legal strategy used to defend your interests. For instance, if you are charged with multiple crimes, it may be best to seek a plea deal instead of risking jail time. Of course, it may also be possible to paint the government as picking on the little guy and try to turn you into a sympathetic figure who should be completely exonerated.

The Types of Cases Our Firm Handles

If you are charged with almost any type of crime, we will likely be able to help you. Common offenses that are pursed by state authorities include assault and battery, drunk driving. and drug possession. The state may also pursue violent crimes such as murder, domestic violence, or rape, and they may also handle cases related to financial crimes that occur within their borders. Let’s take a closer look at some of these charges and the possible penalties associated with these offenses.

Assault and Battery

Assault and battery both involve cases where you attempt to cause harm to another person. However, you can be charged with assault if you intentionally make another person fear imminent harm. Battery occurs when you actually touch someone without that person’s consent in a harmful or offensive way. Penalties associated with an assault or battery conviction may include jail time, a fine, or probation. If you’re convicted of aggravated assault or battery, you may spend time in prison.

Drunk Driving

Drunk driving occurs when you operate a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of .08%. You can also be charged with DUI if you operate a motor vehicle under the influence of prescription medication or controlled substances such as marijuana or cocaine. The penalties for drunk or impaired driving may include jail, a fine, and the loss of driving privileges. Additional penalties may be levied if you fail to submit to chemical testing during a traffic stop.

Drug Possession

If you are in possession of any type of controlled substance, you may be charged with a felony. In the event that you are convicted, you may spend years in prison and face a fine of $1,000 or more. You may also be charged with additional felonies if there is reason to believe that you were going to distribute the controlled substances found on your person, in your car, or in your home. Authorities may charge you with intent to distribute based on the quantity of drugs found or if they discover scales, spoons, or large amounts of cash during a search.

Frequently Asked Questions

What should I expect during the initial consultation?


During the initial consultation, you will be given an opportunity to talk more about the charges that you face and what you did to incur them. However, we will not look at financial records, witness statements, or any other evidence during this conversation. You will have an opportunity to present evidence during a follow-up conversation that will occur if you choose to hire us. It’s important to note that there is no obligation to do so and that the consultation itself is free. You should expect the initial conversation to take about 15 to 30 minutes.

What happens after the initial consultation?


After the initial consultation, you’ll have an opportunity to review our terms of service and decide whether to hire the firm to represent your interests. If you do agree to retain The Criminal Defense Firm, we will assign someone to your case right away. Your Louisiana criminal defense attorney will likely meet with you within several hours to further discuss your case and go over potential defense strategies.

What types of defenses might be used in my case?


There are a number of strategies that might be used to help you obtain the best possible outcome in your case. If there is reason to believe that evidence was obtained illegally, we may ask that it be suppressed prior to trial. We may cite the Fourth Amendment if physical evidence was taken improperly or the Fifth Amendment if there is reason to believe that you were tricked into making statements to authorities. It may also be possible to claim that there was no intent to commit a crime or that the evidence presented by the prosecution fails to prove all the elements of a given crime beyond a reasonable doubt.

What are examples of aggravating factors?


You may hear an officer or prosecutor claim that there are aggravating factors in your case. This may mean that you’ll pay more in bail to secure your release pending trial or that you’ll receive enhanced penalties if convicted of a given crime. Generally speaking, an aggravated offense occurs when you take especially wanton or dangerous actions. These actions may include assaulting a police officer, having a BAC over .15%, or harming a pregnant woman. The fact that you have a prior criminal record may also be seen as an aggravating factor in your case.

Can I appeal a conviction?


If you are convicted of a crime, you have the right to appeal that decision to an appellate court. It may also be possible to appeal that ruling to the highest court in the state or the Supreme Court of the United States if necessary. We may be able to help submit appeal documents or take other steps to potentially overturn a conviction. Our firm may be able to help even if another attorney represented you during the initial trial.

Contact The Criminal Defense Firm Today for Legal Help in Louisiana

If you are in need of a Louisiana criminal defense attorney, do not hesitate to call our nationwide intake number at 866-603-4540. You can also use our contact form to reach out.

Areas of Practice in Louisiana

Dallas 214-817-2053
Houston 713-454-7814
Detroit 313-634-0925
Baton Rouge 225-269-8749
New York 332-239-7345
Winter Park 407-890-0460
Miami 786-751-3247
Portland 207-222-7742
Nationwide 866-603-4540