Minnesota Criminal Defense Attorneys

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Criminal Defense Lawyer in Minnesota

For generations, rumors have swirled that Vikings roamed throughout Minnesota. Although it’s unclear if that is true, the state does have a football team named after the feared Scandinavian warriors. The state is also home to professional baseball and hockey teams while the University of Minnesota is a member of the prestigious Big Ten Conference. Of course, if you commit a crime within Minnesota’s borders, you may also find yourself spending time admiring the inside of one of its jails.

What Happens If You’re Targeted by the State?

If you are targeted by the state for any reason, your best move is to remain silent. While you may think that making a statement is the easiest way for a case to go away, the truth is that talking may only increase your risk of being charged with a crime. If you have already been charged with a crime, making statements to authorities may result in additional charges.

Ideally, the first thing that you’ll do after being taken into custody or otherwise targeted by police or state agents is to contact an attorney. An attorney may be able to review the case against you, help suppress any statements that you have already made or improve your chances of obtaining bail. Depending on the circumstances of the matter, a Minnesota criminal defense attorney may be able to get the case dismissed hours or days after you’re taken into custody.

Put our highly experienced team on your side

Brian J. Kuester
Brian J. Kuester

Former U.S. Attorney

Former DA

Amanda Marshall
Amanda Marshall

Former U.S. Attorney

Local Counsel

Joe Brown
Joe Brown

Former U.S. Attorney
& Former District Attorney

Local Counsel

John W. Sellers
John W. Sellers

Former Senior Trial Attorney
U.S. Department of Justice

Local Counsel

John W. Sellers
Linda Julin McNamara

Former Chief, DOJ Appeals

Local Counsel

Elizabeth Stepp
Elizabeth Stepp

Litigation Counsel

Aaron L. Wiley
Aaron L. Wiley

Former Federal Prosecutor

Local Counsel

Roger Bach
Roger Bach

Former Special Agent (OIG)

Timothy E. Allen
Timothy E. Allen

Former Senior Special Agent

Chris Quick
Chris Quick

Former Special Agent (FBI & IRS-CI)

David M. Bentz
David M. Bentz

Former U.S. Secret Service Agent

Ray Yuen
Ray Yuen

Former Supervisory Special Agent (FBI)

Other Potential Benefits to Hiring an Attorney

Perhaps the best reason to hire legal counsel is because prosecutors, judges, and others tend to have more respect for them as opposed to defendants. This isn’t to say that the state doesn’t respect your rights or isn’t interested in having a fair trial. However, those representing the other side in your criminal proceeding are more likely to act in good faith if you have someone who understands what your rights are and what to do if they may have been violated.

It’s also worth noting that an attorney may be better positioned to make smart decisions as your case unfolds. For example, your advocate won’t feel pressure to take a poor plea deal just to get out of jail as quickly as possible. Instead, your attorney will likely advise you of the possibility that you’ll be released on bail in a few days or weeks. After you are released, you have more flexibility to negotiate a deal that is better aligned with your interests.

Why You Should Consider Hiring The Criminal Law Defense Firm

The folks at The Criminal Law Defense Firm are mostly former federal prosecutors or former members of federal agencies such as the IRS, OIG, or DEA. Therefore, you will be retaining the services of people who understand how the government works and who are not intimidated by prosecutors or others who may be trying to cause a serious interruption to your life.

It’s important to note that you will never be handed off to a junior associate or to a paralegal at any point while your case is pending. Therefore, you can feel confident that the person who you are paying to represent you is the person who will review documents or talk to the prosecutor on your behalf. This will also be the person who shows up in court during pretrial hearings or when your trial begins.

If necessary, your legal representative can help with any appeals that might occur if you’re found guilty. In the event that you are acquitted of a charge, the case is over and the government cannot try you for the same incident regardless of how they feel about the outcome.

The Types of Cases Our Firm Helps With

Our firm will help with almost any type of case that you might bring us. For instance, if you are charged with murder, we will likely be able to create a defense that might lead to an acquittal or a favorable plea deal. If you are charged with drunk driving, we may be able to cast doubt on the results of a field sobriety test in an effort to get the case dismissed. We can also assist with financial crimes, crimes involving children, or standard assault and battery cases.

What to Know About Assault and Battery

Assault and battery are often used interchangeably to describe cases ranging from punching someone during a bar fight to engaging in an altercation with a spouse. However, it’s important to note that these words do not describe the same crimes. Typically, an assault occurs when you make someone fear imminent harm. Battery occurs when you intentionally touch someone without permission and cause harm or offense to that individual.

Burglary Can Mean Many Different Things

If you’re charged with burglary, it may mean that you have stolen items from a store or residence. It may also mean that you broke into someone’s car and took things from the trunk. It may also mean that you walked into an abandoned factory to smoke marijuana or cause property damage.

Financial Crimes May Become Federal Cases

Financial crimes such as defrauding a bank or failing to file a tax return may begin as state cases. However, there is a chance that they may become federal cases. This may be true if you also failed to file a federal tax return or if information on a past state return doesn’t match what you tell the feds. Furthermore, if you defraud a company or bank that is active in multiple states, it may fall under the federal government’s ability to regulate interstate commerce.

Frequently Asked Questions

Will I go to jail if convicted of a crime?


There is no guarantee that you will be sentenced to jail or prison time as the result of being convicted of a criminal offense. That will depend on the severity of the crime that you’re convicted of, your criminal history, and other factors deemed relevant in the matter. It’s also possible that you could be sent to jail in the future if you violate the terms of probation or of a suspended sentence.

Can I speak freely to my attorney?


Anything that you say to your attorney is considered to be confidential information. In fact, anything that you say during the initial consultation is also considered privileged information as you are talking to someone who may eventually be your lawyer. You are strongly encouraged to be as open and honest as possible with the person who is tasked with representing your interests during the legal process. This is because it is much easier for counsel to create a legal strategy when that person knows as much about the case as possible.

What happens during the initial consultation?


During the initial consultation, you will be given an opportunity to tell your story without the need to divulge your name or any other identifying information. At the end of the consultation, you will likely receive a contract that you can choose to sign or ignore. If you sign our proposal, someone will be assigned to your case immediately, and this person may take steps to secure your release, negotiate a plea deal, or get the case dismissed.

How do you decide who gets put on my case?


There are a number of factors that are used to determine who will be assigned to your defense team. For instance, we try to find someone who is located as close to you as possible. We will also try to pair you with someone who has a background with cases similar to yours. If you were charged with tax fraud, we might select someone who has worked with the IRS or who has tried tax evasion cases previously.

Why might I receive a plea deal in my case?


Prosecutors offer plea deals for a multitude of reasons. For example, they may believe that it might be difficult to obtain a conviction if a given case was taken to trial. It’s also possible that the prosecutor in your case doesn’t typically pursue cases related to marijuana use or other crimes that aren’t considered dangerous offenses. It’s important to note that accepting a plea results in a criminal conviction on your record. Therefore, you may have difficulty obtaining housing, an education, or a job after your case has been resolved. Your Minnesota criminal defense attorney may be able to provide more insight into what it means to receive or accept a plea deal.

Contact The Criminal Defense Firm Today

If you are looking for a Minnesota criminal defense attorney, feel free to contact us by calling 866-603-4540. You can also get in touch with us using our online contact form.

Dallas 214-817-2053
Houston 713-454-7814
Detroit 313-634-0925
Baton Rouge 225-269-8749
New York 332-239-7345
Winter Park 407-890-0460
Miami 786-751-3247
Portland 207-222-7742
Nationwide 866-603-4540