Criminal Defense Lawyer in Rhode Island

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Rhode Island Criminal Defense Attorney

Rhode Island is the smallest state in the country in terms of area. However, there is still plenty to see and do while here. For instance, the Roger Williams Zoo in Providence has over 100 animals to look at, a food truck, and other amenities. You can also visit the International Tennis Hall of Fame as well as the Cliff Walk in Newport. While you are encouraged to have fun while in Rhode Island, you are also encouraged to act in a lawful manner if you want to avoid visiting a local holding facility.

What to Know If You’ve Been Contacted By the Police

If you are contacted by the police for any reason, it’s generally in your best interest to remain silent. Let’s say that your vehicle is stopped because an officer saw it traveling faster than the posted speed limit. The officer who conducts the stop may ask if you have been drinking or if there is anything in the car that he or she should worry about.

If you admit to having a drink or two, it may serve as probable cause to conduct field sobriety tests or a chemical breath test. Meanwhile, staying silent may result in little more than a speeding ticket or a warning to slow down. In the event that you are charged with a crime after a search of your vehicle or other belongings, staying silent may make it harder for a prosecutor to obtain a conviction.

The only time that you want to make a statement is to inform an officer that you would like an attorney present. Once this happens, you can no longer be questioned until a Rhode Island criminal defense attorney is by your side. If you are questioned, anything that you say may be thrown out before or during a trial.

Put our highly experienced team on your side

Brian J. Kuester
Brian J. Kuester

Former U.S. Attorney

Former DA

Amanda Marshall
Amanda Marshall

Former U.S. Attorney

Local Counsel

Joe Brown
Joe Brown

Former U.S. Attorney
& Former District Attorney

Local Counsel

John W. Sellers
John W. Sellers

Former Senior Trial Attorney
U.S. Department of Justice

Local Counsel

John W. Sellers
Linda Julin McNamara

Former Chief, DOJ Appeals

Local Counsel

Elizabeth Stepp
Elizabeth Stepp

Litigation Counsel

Aaron L. Wiley
Aaron L. Wiley

Former Federal Prosecutor

Local Counsel

Roger Bach
Roger Bach

Former Special Agent (OIG)

Timothy E. Allen
Timothy E. Allen

Former Senior Special Agent

Chris Quick
Chris Quick

Former Special Agent (FBI & IRS-CI)

David M. Bentz
David M. Bentz

Former U.S. Secret Service Agent

Ray Yuen
Ray Yuen

Former Supervisory Special Agent (FBI)

How an Attorney May Help After Initial Contact

After you have been arrested, you may be transferred to a local jail for several hours. It’s not uncommon for defendants to be given an opportunity to bail out of jail while their cases go through the legal process. If you are denied bail, your attorney may work to get that decision overturned. Your advocate may also ask a judge to reduce the amount that you need to pay to secure your release or ask to have the charges dropped.

If the case does proceed to trial, your counselor will take a variety of steps to help you obtain a favorable outcome in your case. For instance, your advocate may be able to get access to any records that the state has in your case. It may also be possible for this person to make statements on your behalf to the media or others who may want to hear from you.

Hiring an attorney from The Criminal Defense Firm may be especially helpful because we have a roster of mostly former federal agents or former federal prosecutors. Therefore, you can feel good that your advocate is going to have a solid understanding of how the government approaches a case. The insight that we may be able to gain from what the state does or doesn’t do throughout the legal process may help you avoid a conviction or minimize the penalties you might face if convicted.

The Types of Cases Our Firm Handles

The Criminal Defense Firm handles a wide range of criminal cases such as those related to drunk driving, drug possession, or tax evasion. We can also help with cases related to theft, fraud, or violent crimes such as murder or manslaughter. If you are accused of domestic violence, sexual assault, or assault and battery of any kind, we can likely help as well. It’s important to note that our attorneys may be available to help you defend against state and federal charges at the same time. Let’s take a closer look at some of the types of charges that we defend against most often.

Assault and Battery

Assault and battery are often thought of as the same type of crime. While they are similar in nature, there is a significant difference between the two charges. Assault is the crime of putting someone in fear of harm. Battery is the crime of intentionally touching someone else without their consent, causing harm or offense. In some circumstances, both can be felonies.

Drug Possession

Federal law makes it illegal to possess any amount of a controlled substance. State law also widely prohibits the possession of controlled substances such as heroin, LSD, or cocaine. You may also be charged with a crime for having prescription medication that is intended for use by another person on your person, in your car, or in your backpack. In the event that a large quantity of a controlled substance is discovered during a search, you may be charged with possession with intent to distribute.

Impaired Driving

You may be charged with DUI whether you are impaired by drugs or alcohol. In addition, you can be charged with DUI even if your blood alcohol content (BAC) is below .08%, which is the legal limit to operate a motor vehicle. If you are under the age of 21, you can be charged with this crime if your BAC is 0.02% or above.

Theft

Theft tends to be an umbrella term that describes a variety of crimes such as robbery, burglary, or larceny. Robbery and larceny typically refer to taking items that don’t belong to you with or without force. However, burglary means that you have entered a structure with the intent to commit any type of crime.

Frequently Asked Questions

What types of penalties might I face if convicted?


If you are convicted of a crime, you may spend time in jail or prison, pay a fine, or be placed on probation. There is also a chance that you will receive a suspended sentence or be required to perform community service in lieu of a fine or jail time. The severity of your sentence will depend on multiple factors such as whether you were convicted of a felony or misdemeanor as well as your criminal history. The judge in your case may also take into account whether you have shown any remorse for your actions.

Why might a prosecutor offer a plea deal?


The prosecutor in your case may offer a plea deal because it can serve as an effective way to keep the court docket running smoothly. You may also receive a deal in your case if the prosecution doesn’t think that it can obtain a conviction at trial. It’s important to note that accepting a plea means that you are pleading guilty to the crimes listed in the agreement. If you have a prior criminal history, another conviction may trigger mandatory minimum sentencing guidelines. Your Rhode Island criminal defense attorney may be able to talk more about the potential pros and cons of accepting a deal.

Why might I be denied bail?


You might be denied bail if you are accused of committing a serious offense such as murder, arson, or rape. The same might be true if you have a criminal history, and your criminal history may work against you regardless of the severity of your prior offenses. Finally, you may be denied an opportunity to secure your release from jail because you are deemed to be a flight risk.

What should I expect during the initial consultation?


When you get in touch with us, you’ll have an opportunity to say as much or as little as you’d like about your case. There is no need to divulge your name, location, or anything else that you’d like to keep to yourself for the time being. However, you should know that anything that you do say is likely to be protected by the attorney-client privilege. This means that nothing that is communicated to whoever you speak with will be relayed to the government. It also means that the government won’t be able to listen to the call.

What is attorney-client privilege?


Attorney-client privilege means that anything you tell your attorney is considered to be confidential. This is to ensure that you feel free to provide your legal counsel with enough information to provide you with a quality defense. Typically, privilege lasts for the rest of your attorney’s life, which means that you don’t have to worry about anyone finding out what was said before, during, or after your trial. An exception may be made in the event that you waive privilege for any reason.

Contact The Criminal Defense Firm

If you are in need of a Rhode Island criminal defense attorney, don’t hesitate to talk to one of The Criminal Defense Firm’s representatives by calling 866-603-4540 or fill out the contact form here on our website.

Dallas 214-817-2053
Houston 713-454-7814
Detroit 313-634-0925
Baton Rouge 225-269-8749
New York 332-239-7345
Winter Park 407-890-0460
Miami 786-751-3247
Portland 207-222-7742
Nationwide 866-603-4540