Criminal Defense Lawyer in Wisconsin

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Wisconsin Criminal Defense Attorneys

Wisconsin has long been renowned for its dairy industry with its cheese being touted as some of the best in the nation. The state is also home to the University of Wisconsin as well as the Green Bay Packers. Green Bay is one of the oldest teams in the NFL and has been one of the most successful franchises during its tenure in the league. Of course, if you break the law while traveling to a Packers game or a local farm, you could spend several months or years in a state jail or prison.

Your Rights After Being Charged With a Crime

If you are charged with a crime, it’s generally in your best interest to say as little as possible to the authorities. Anything that you say can be used against you and likely will be entered into evidence at some point during the legal process. It’s important to note that authorities may try to tempt you to talk by offering leniency in your case. However, there is no guarantee that you will be allowed to leave custody or will be shown any other types of clemency in exchange for a statement.

Ideally, the only reason that you would break your silence is to request a Wisconsin criminal defense attorney. An attorney can sit with you during an interrogation to ensure that it is conducted in accordance with state and federal law. Legal counsel may also be able to put a stop to an interrogation or otherwise prevent you from making written or oral statements that might incriminate you.

Put our highly experienced team on your side

Brian J. Kuester
Brian J. Kuester

Former U.S. Attorney

Former DA

Amanda Marshall
Amanda Marshall

Former U.S. Attorney

Local Counsel

Joe Brown
Joe Brown

Former U.S. Attorney
& Former District Attorney

Local Counsel

John W. Sellers
John W. Sellers

Former Senior Trial Attorney
U.S. Department of Justice

Local Counsel

John W. Sellers
Linda Julin McNamara

Former Chief, DOJ Appeals

Local Counsel

Joanne Fine DeLena
Joanne Fine DeLena

Former Assistant U.S. Attorney

Local Counsel

Aaron L. Wiley
Aaron L. Wiley

Former Federal Prosecutor

Local Counsel

Roger Bach
Roger Bach

Former Special Agent (OIG)

Chris Quick
Chris Quick

Former Special Agent (FBI & IRS-CI)

Kevin M. Sheridan
Kevin M. Sheridan

Former Special Agent (FBI)

Ray Yuen
Ray Yuen

Former Supervisory Special Agent (FBI)

Dennis A. Wichern
Dennis A. Wichern

Former Special Agent-in-Charge (DEA)

The Benefits of Working With Our Firm

One of the benefits of working with The Criminal Law Defense Firm is that many of our attorneys have spent time working as federal prosecutors or as members of federal agencies. Therefore, they have a strong understanding of how the government works as it relates to pursuing criminal cases.

This can work to your advantage because whoever represents your interests will likely be able to spot flaws in the case against you. Furthermore, your attorney may be able to develop legal strategies based on decisions the government makes. For instance, if the state chooses to pursue a misdemeanor charge over a felony, it may mean that there are questions about the evidence in your case.

Seeing this, your representative may choose to take an aggressive stance as it relates to getting all of the charges against you dropped. At a minimum, the state may be more likely to accept a favorable plea if it knows that it faces a serious challenge if the matter goes to trial.

It’s also worth noting that prosecutors and judges tend to have a high level of respect for the members of our firm. This may work in your favor because authorities are more likely to treat you better knowing that any missteps might result in a case being dismissed. Ultimately, you may be treated better during interrogations or receive favorable rulings at trial because of the work that your legal representative has put into creating a track record of success.

The Types of Cases We Typically Take in Wisconsin

Our firm will be able to assist with almost any type of criminal case that you might bring us. Typically, state authorities deal with cases such as theft, murder, or traffic offenses like drunk or reckless driving. You may also face state charges in connection with an assault or battery or stand trial in a state court on sexual assault, arson, or fraud charges.

Theft or Burglary

Theft occurs when you take something that belongs to someone else without permission and with the intent of permanently depriving them of it. Therefore, you could be charged with theft if you steal a television from a retail store or if you refuse to return your neighbor’s snow shovel after being asked to give it back. Burglary is slightly different than theft because it simply means that you gained entry into a dwelling with the intent to commit a felony once inside.

Drunk or Reckless Driving

State law prohibits you from operating a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of more than .08%. However, you may be charged with impaired or reckless driving regardless of what your BAC is if an officer determines that you are showing signs of impairment. Common signs of impairment include an inability to speak, difficulty standing, or open containers of alcohol in your car. You may also be charged with a crime if your vehicle smells like alcohol, marijuana, or other substances that may lead to impairment.

Defenses We May Use During Your Case

There are a number of defenses that we might use in your case depending on the facts of the case and your desired outcome.

If the evidence suggests that you did nothing wrong, we may argue that the case should be dismissed. For example, if authorities can’t find the weapon you allegedly used to commit a violent crime, it may be easier to assert that no crime actually occurred.

It may also be possible to cast doubt on the case against you by pointing to inconsistencies in witness testimony or errors in a police report. Finally, we may point to chain of custody problems or issues obtaining statements or other evidence in your case.

Frequently Asked Questions

Am I allowed to talk to authorities?


Yes, you are allowed to say whatever you want as the legal process unfolds. The reason why it’s generally better to say nothing is that it prevents the state from gaining evidence that it might use at trial. It may also prevent you from saying anything that might provide the state with probable cause to charge you with a crime or charge you with additional crimes.

What should I know about the initial consultation?


The initial consultation is an opportunity to talk about your case, tell us your story and generally get a chance to learn more about our firm. Conversely, we will use this initial conversation as an opportunity to get to know you better and start thinking about how we can meet your needs. It’s important to note that what you tell is typically considered to be privileged information as you are talking to someone who may eventually serve as your attorney.

However, you do not need to tell us your name or provide any records that might contain identifying information. You should also know that talking to us about your case doesn’t mean that you have to hire us. When the consultation is over, you will receive a proposal that you can either sign or ignore at your discretion.

What happens after the initial consultation?


If you agree to our proposal, an attorney will be assigned to your case and an in-person meeting will be scheduled. However, your representative usually starts representing your interests immediately after being chosen to work on your matter. Therefore, it’s possible that certain steps have already been taken in an effort to have the case dismissed or to obtain your release from custody. During the in-person meeting, you can submit documents, talk more about electronic devices in your possession or go over anything else you may believe is relevant to your case.

Will others be forced to testify against me?


There is a chance that the government will ask friends, family members, and others who associate with you to testify during your trial. However, they may not necessarily be required to do so, and the government generally cannot compel your spouse to say anything that might incriminate you.

It’s important to add that you are not required to testify during your trial and that your Wisconsin criminal defense attorney will likely recommend that you don’t. An exception may be if there is reason to believe that telling your story would make you into a sympathetic figure in the eyes of the jury.

Contact The Criminal Defense Firm Today

If you need a Wisconsin criminal defense attorney, contact The Criminal Defense Law Firm’s nationwide intake number at 866-603-4540. There is also a live chat function on our website that may also enable you to obtain information about our services in a timely manner.

Dallas 214-817-2053
Houston 713-454-7814
Detroit 313-634-0925
Baton Rouge 225-269-8749
New York 332-239-7345
Winter Park 407-890-0460
Miami 786-751-3247
Portland 207-222-7742
Nationwide 866-603-4540